2008

SUMMER CAMP 2008 – INSTRUCTORS & COURSES

B: Beginner I: Intermediate A: Advanced
Brian Butler
Fingerstyle Blues (B/I): We’ll play several picking styles derived from blues masters like Jimmy Reed and Mance Lipscomb. We’ll cover a few different keys and learn turnarounds, chord inversions and licks that’ll sound low-down and tasty!
Acoustic Rock and Roll (B/I): We’ll cover songs from rock and roll artists like Chuck Berry and Delbert McClinton. We’ll work on getting a big sound on our acoustics for songs that were originally intended for a full band. We’ll employ chord inversions, bass runs and riffs to get a good groove going while getting a full and varied sound.
June Cannon
Absolute Beginner Fiddle: If you’ve always wanted to play the fiddle but are not sure how to get started, this is your opportunity. How to hold it and look cool, basic bow control, rhythm patterns, how to get the notes and maybe even a wee tune. Bring your own fiddle if you have one in working order, or June will have a limited number to lend for the weekend.

Celtic Fiddle Tunes: If you have already begun your fiddling journey and can play, in this class you can learn a couple of tunes from the Celtic repertoire, some details of the Celtic styles, advance your bowing technique, explore shuffling and slurring to give your tunes accent and drive, and find answers to other questions you may have about fiddling.

Bob Evans
Fingerstyle Guitar Accompaniment (B/I): In this class we’ll discuss finger-picking techniques for accompanying songs in standard and drop D tuning. The course will discuss several right hand accompaniment techniques, including brushed thumb, arpeggiated and alternating bass patterns; adjusting the right hand accompaniment pattern to change the “groove” of the accompaniment; using alternate chord voicings, turnarounds and endings to make your accompaniments more interesting.
Introduction to Arranging Fingerstyle Guitar Solos (I/A): This class will provide an introduction to arranging instrumental solos for fingerstyle guitar. Topics discussed will include tips on how to pick out a melody by ear; choosing an appropriate key for the arrangement; the challenges of playing the bass and the melody on one instrument (you can’t be in two places at once – or can you?) and how to enhance the basic arrangement. The examples will be presented in the context of developing instrumental breaks to insert in a vocal piece.
Bonnie Ferguson
Vocal Technique: The class will begin with a guided relaxation technique connecting your mind to your breathing process. We will gradually add sound to the breath with some playful exercises. This will teach you to have conscious control of your breath and lead to greater control of, and confidence in your singing and speaking voice.
Repertoire Class: We will be sampling a wonderful variety of music from swing to folk to gospel and songs from musicals in a stimulating and encouraging atmosphere. You will learn how to choose repertoire that suits your particular tastes and style. By trying material from a wide range of styles you can make new discoveries and new connections that broaden your musical palette.
Neil Fraser
Advanced Improvisation (I/A): Explore single note soloing over jazz tunes using scales, triads and arpeggios to create substitutions that will add colour to your playing. Knowledge of a scale system (for example, the C-A-G-E-D system) would definitely be an asset.

Advanced Jazz Chords (I/A): This class will explore how to create interesting chords while supporting a soloist by: manipulating the basic inversions of the chords; using chord scales; 1/2 step approaches, and other devices. Pre-requisite: knowledge of inversions of min7, maj7, dom7 chords on the top four strings.

Rueben Gurr
R & B Band: Don’t wait ’til that midnight hour, R & B fans! This “I Feel Good” workshop features chords, progressions, grooves and arrangement ideas for one or two guitars as well as arrangement ideas for larger groups exploring late fifties to mid sixties Rhythm & Blues. Discover what the Raylettes were singing behind Ray. Discover what Sam thought of Dave. This class is open to all levels and all instruments including voice.
Improv 101 – Building a Solo: This workshop will focus on building 12 & 16 bar solos from a thematic point of view. Using just a few rhythmic patterns and melodic ideas, we will work through tunes that everyone knows, exploring common short cuts used to play over specific chords. Les Paul could make a solo out of three notes! First time soloists and all instruments are especially welcome.
Guido Heisteck
Simple Guitar (B/I): It doesn’t need to be fancy to be good! A low-key class aimed at helping students expand on the basic mechanics of
Ukulele: If you take the two lowest strings off a guitar and put a capo on the fifth fret you have a ukulele. It’s a little piece of a guitar. This class will explore chord melody on the uke as well as some pieces out of old Hawaiian ukulele methods and maybe even some claw-hammer playing. Final decisions on content will be made when we see who signs up. So look up in your attic or crawl space, there may be a uke up there. Borrow one from a friend. If you have two bring em’ both! You may make it possible for a poor ukeless someone to try out this little four-stringed wonder! Open to all students with guitar or uke experience.
Orville Johnson
Bottleneck Slide Guitar (B/I): Learn how to control the slide, muting and damping techniques, what to do with your picking hand, and how to get good tone. We’ll start in standard tuning and explore some open G and/or D as time permits. Get a slide that fits on your pinky
Accoustic Lead Guitar (I): Wondering what to do when the singer looks at you and says ‘take it!’? She means take this class! Learn how to play solos and fills, try some patterns and licks, look at some blues and fiddle tune styles, and figure out how to meld technical skills into a coherent and expressive solo. Use space to your advantage, provide sensitive accompaniment, and when your time comes, you’ll be ready to burn that solo up.
Dave Lidstone
Country Repertoire: We will learn some great songs from the masters of country music–nothing newer than 1970. Along the way, we will learn and use the Nashville numbering system, a range of strumming patterns for accompaniment, and introductions and exits that will make it easier to play these songs with others.
Introductory Lead Guitar (B/I): We will study and practice what can be played (scales, melodies, chord forms, tricky licks), where it can be played (intros, fills, solos and exits), and how it can be played (left and right hand exercises, ways to view the fingerboard). We will put this in the context of soloing for a couple of familiar songs.
Lauri Lyster

Beginner Percussion: This class will start with some basic rhythmic practice which we’ll then apply to tastefully fit into various styles including latin, swing, pop, etc. We’ll use some of the more common percussion instruments that you’ll encounter including bells and clave, shakers, tambourine, hand and stick drums. Bring percussion instruments if you have them.

It’s all in the Groove: In this intermediate class we’ll analyze various recorded grooves and decide what/when/how to add percussion. This class is all about creating a groove and listening carefully to the “track” and/or other musicians to see what “fits”. Bring favourite recordings and percussion instruments if you have them.
Bob Stark
Songwriting: We will review the basic elements of songwriting: lyrics, melody, form. This will involve: CD listening sessions, written exercises and “sweatshops”, class participation, including (positive) critiques of finished compositions and/or works in progress. The goal will be to move you beyond where you are currently – “take a sad song and make it better”. The course will be guitar-oriented but open to all. Humming is a musical instrument! Bring a pen, some paper, and a-muse.”
Brian Tate
The Swing and Beyond Choir: This course is a fun-filled introduction to the music of swing and beyond. Lift up your voice with fellow singing enthusiasts with arrangements of swing, bebop, and the roots of jazz: gospel, blues, African and Afro-Cuban music. Learn how to sing parts and develop a repertoire of different vocal styles. All levels are welcome: music reading skills are not essential. There will be opportunities for soloists.
The Singers Master Class: An intimate and dynamic class designed for you to discover your power through your voice, expand your confidence and creativity, connect powerfully with your audience, and take any song and make it uniquely yours. You need not have any singing experience to do this workshop! Come with a song of your own choice memorized.

2007

SUMMER CAMP 2007 – INSTRUCTORS & COURSES

B: Beginner I: Intermediate A: Advanced
Laurel Bliss
Beginning Harmony: Come sing classic harmonies and learn the basics of creating your own, all by ear, in styles including folk, early country, bluegrass and gospel. If you can match pitch and can sing a basic melody, you’ll find this class easy and fun.
Intermediate Harmony: This is a class for those who have sung some harmony and want the fun and challenge of fine tuning. We’ll learn how to work out harmony arrangements in duets, trios and quartets and perform for each other using folk, early country, bluegrass and gospel songs.
Brian Butler
Fingerstyle Blues (B/I): We’ll play several picking styles derived from blues masters like Jimmy Reed and Mance Lipscomb. We’ll cover a few different keys and learn turnarounds, chord inversions and licks that’ll sound low-down and tasty!
Acoustic Rock and Roll (B/I): We’ll cover songs from rock and roll artists like Chuck Berry and Delbert McClinton. We’ll work on getting a big sound on our acoustics for songs that were originally intended for a full band. We’ll employ chord inversions, bass runs and riffs to get a good groove going while getting a full and varied sound.
Bob Evans
Fingerstyle Guitar Acompaniment (B/I): This class will introduce finger picking guitar for accompanying songs. Arpeggio and alternating bass (Travis style) patterns will be presented; we’ll discuss right hand technique. We’ll apply the basic patterns in several keys and time signatures through song examples.
Introduction to Arranging Fingerstyle Guitar Solos (I/A): This class will provide an introduction to arranging instrumental solos for fingerstyle guitar. Topics discussed will include tips on how to pick out a melody by ear; finding an appropriate key that works for the arrangement, the challenges of fitting the bass and melody on one instrument (you can’t be in two places at once – or can you?) and how to enhance the basic arrangement. Two arrangements will be discussed.
Rueben Gurr
R & B Band: This “I Feel Good” workshop features chords, progressions, grooves and arrangement ideas for one or two guitars as well as arrangement ideas for larger groups exploring late fifties to mid sixties Rhythm & Blues. Discover what the Raylettes were singing behind Ray. Discover what Sam thought of Dave. This class is open to all levels and all instruments including voice.
Tunings (I): Explore basic to advanced open tunings of G, D, and DADGAD and how these tunings apply to standard folk, blues and classic rock repertoire. There will be plenty of handouts in standard tab-everything from Joni to Muddy.
Dave Lidstone
Country Repertoire: We will learn some great songs from the masters of country music. Along the way, we will learn and use the Nashville numbering system, a range of strumming patterns for accompaniment, and introductions and exits that will make it easier to play these tunes with others.

Lead Guitar for Country & Folk: We will study and practice what can be played (scales, melodies, chord forms, tricky licks), where it can be played (intros, fills, solos, exits), and how it can be played (left and right hand exercises, ways to view the fingerboard). We will put this in the context of soloing for a few familiar songs.

Lauri Lyster

Beginner Percussion: This class will start with some basic rhythmic practice which we’ll then apply to tastefully fit into various styles including latin, swing, pop, etc. We’ll use some of the more common percussion instruments that you’ll encounter including bells and clave, shakers, tambourine, hand and stick drums. Bring percussion instruments if you have them.

It’s all in the Groove: In this intermediate class we’ll analyze various recorded grooves and decide what/when/how to add percussion. This class is all about creating a groove and listening carefully to the “track” and/or other musicians to see what “fits”. Bring favourite recordings and percussion instruments if you have them.
Craig McGregor
Play What You Hear (I): Learn a system that will let you play familiar melodies by ear. We’ll begin with diatonic melodies we all know and work through a series of exercises to get you started playing anything you hear.
Motif-based Soloing (I/A): Learn to improvise cohesive musical solos by developing one motif over a harmonic cadence or chord progression. We’ll look at a variety of motifs including ideas from the songs we are playing. Prerequisite: Be able to play a major scale and be comfortable with chord progressions.
Ron Peters
Advanced Swing/Jazz Improvisation: Improvisation is a language. In this class we will learns the basic vocabulary of the style. Learn to build scales into arpeggios and arpeggios into phrases that outline the chord changes. Some theory will be discussed but emphasis will be on playing these ideas. Start turning heads at those jams!
Advanced Guitar Chord Voicing: This class is a systematic look at the “voicing” (note arrangement) of chords on the guitar. Learning these techniques can help you find new ways to play familiar chords. We will cover Raise 2, Raise 2 & 3, Drop 2, and 4th Voicings through all inversions. Take that comping to a new level!
Jaime Rokeby-Thomas
Groovin’ West Coast Fiddle Tunes: The newest fiddle “tradition” in Canada is that of the west coast. We will explore this new and eclectic music.
Fiddle Ensemble Explorations: Making Music with Others: In this class we will take some standard fiddle repertoire and discover how to transform music into a multi dimensional listening experience in a fun and informative group setting. We will explore harmony, rhythm and texture in creating great ensemble arrangements. Fiddles, violas, cellos, bass, mandolin, flute, whistle, and possible others are welcome.
Jennifer Scott
Vocal Technique: For beginners or as a “brush-up” for more experienced singers. Learn about tone quality, flexibility of voice and comprehensive breathing. All will be achieved in a peaceful and safe environment that will enable you to utilize your singing voice to its top potential. Taping of the class is highly recommended!
Song Styles and Repertoire: Learn some new styles of music or expand your existing knowledge of reggae, gospel, jazz and swing, roots and blues. We’ll look at these song styles and figure out how to make them sound authentic. The goal of this class will be to broaden your horizons and enjoy singing these beautiful songs both in an ensemble and as a solo performer. We’ll also look at performance techniques and some stage-craft.
Bob Stark
Songwriting: From Tin Pan Alley to Alice Cooper (B/I): Explore the Five Dubyas of songwriting: Why (purpose), Where (the biffy or the Bentley), What (protest or love songs), When (before or after the lobotomy), and Who (or should that be “Whom”). Take a word, find a better one. Write a line, match it or write a better line … or a song! Survey the key elements of form and point of reference. Resources/tips to get you started. Solutions to “writer’s block”. Bring pen, paper and a -muse.
Rene Worst
Bass (I): This class will be a hands-on look at the basics: left and right hand techniques, and how to play in different styles including “2 feel”, swing, walking lines, latin and straight eight feels (bossa, samba, pop), as well as walking through chord changes.

How Music Works (I): This is a hands-on class for all instruments including voice. We’ll play tunes with different kinds of chord progressions including simple jazz standards, blues, a modal tune and a tune in a minor key, focusing on scales and chords and how to make them work together.

2006

SUMMER CAMP 2006 – INSTRUCTORS & COURSES

B: Beginner I: Intermediate A: Advanced
Phil Belanger
Swing and Folk Style Accompaniment: This class will get you groovin’ on the snare drum, hi-hat, and cymbals using brushes and sticks. We’ll explore what makes a rhythm “feel good” and how to support and “lead” the band. Other percussion instruments are welcome as well.
Latin and Brazilian Rhythms: This course will involve playing the most common rhythms, including the bossa-nova, samba, cha-cha and salsa. We’ll have fun learning the basic playing techniques for congas, shakers, guiro, cowbell, pandeiro, surdo and more!
Laurel Bliss
Beginning Harmony: Come sing classic harmonies and learn the basics of creating your own, all by ear, in styles including folk, early country, bluegrass and gospel. If you can match pitch and can sing a basic melody, you’ll find this class easy and fun.
Intermediate Harmony: This is a class for those who have sung some harmony and want the fun and challenge of fine tuning. We’ll learn how to work out harmony arrangements in duets, trios and quartets and perform for each other using folk, early country, bluegrass and gospel songs.
Rick Fines
Slide Guitar (B/I): We’ll look at techniques essential to slide, such as vibrato, left- and right-hand muting, hammer-ons and pull-offs. We’ll play together, exploring these techniques and basic principles of pitch and right-hand fingering. Both open and standard tuning will be used as we coax sounds from our bottleneck ranging from sweet and melodic to the sting of Muddy Waters. Bring your slide!
Blues Fingerstyle Guitar (B/I): We’ll explore many blues riffs that work in a Delta Blues style while keeping the bass parts with the right hand thumb.
Bob Franke
Songwriting (B/I): A lecture, short individual interviews, and their resulting songwriting assignments form a springboard from which creative leaps of faith happen. In a safe, creative environment we’ll write these songs and form a more accurate and compassionate “outer critic” to replace an “inner critic” that may be too destructive without proper training. Discover along the way that songwriting genius is ubiquitous!
Don Fraser
Beginning Fingerpicking (B/I): Using basic chord changes we’ll learn to play fingerstyle patterns to accompany ourselves or others. We’ll learn how to create interest with alternating basses, bass runs, hammer-ons and pull-offs. If time permits, we’ll work on a simple tune complete with accompaniment.
Things to Do with Two Guitars (I): We don’t all have to play the same thing! We will develop some strategies for playing together, using a variety of techniques, “capocraft”, open string possibilities, fills and melodic phrases. Bring a song you’d like to work on.
Rueben Gurr
Party Guitar (B/I): Come and learn a fun selection of classic rock and pop tunes from the 50s to the 80s. Learn repertoire and get tips on jamming, musicianship, arranging and singing. While the emphasis will be on rhythm guitar playing and technique, this class is open to all singers and players. Chord and lyrics charts will be provided.
Tunings (I): Explore basic to advanced open tunings of G, D, and DADGAD and how these tunings apply to standard folk, blues and classic rock repertoire. There will be plenty of handouts in standard tab-everything from Joni to Muddy.
Sue Malcolm
Beyond Beginner Guitar: For those with a basic knowledge of these first position chords: G, A, C, D, E. We’ll review these and practice B and F. We’ll also practice strumming and changing chords smoothly with a focus on developing good rhythm. Please bring a capo, and discover how you can play hundreds of songs in many keys with just a few simple chords and this valuable tool!

Slow Pitch Jam: Develop the skills necessary to create music successfully in a group: communication, timing, dynamics, beginnings and endings, and confidence. Students should have a basic knowledge of chords and be able to change chords smoothly – speed is not necessary.
Craig McGregor
Beginner and Intermediate Flat-picking: In this class we’ll address specific technique problems of the right hand and try to solve them with cross-picking, pattern picking, and hammer-ons and pull-offs. All techniques will be applied to tunes. In the intermediate class we will also cover sweep picking and “floating” (playing melodic lines alternating between fretted and open strings, creating a harp effect).
Ron Peters
Advanced Improvisation (I/A): You know your scales, so now what? Learn how to use them to create intervals, arpeggios and other melodic structures that can imply extensions or alterations of the chords and harmony. Scales are like the alphabet, you must learn to spell the words (chords) and write the sentences (musical phrases) to paint your story (improvisation).
Jazz Harmony (I/A): This advanced class is about learning the subtlety and nuance of jazz harmony. Using standards as a model, we will learn various techniques to put some “colour” into chord progressions to make your playing sparkle and your original tunes get noticed. If you’ve been working on Harmony and Theory but need some new perspectives, then this is your next class. Previous theory experience is required.
Jaime Rokeby-Thomas
French-Canadian Fiddle (B/I): Fiddlers will enjoy learning (by ear, nice and slow) 3 or 4 traditional Quebecois tunes, including lively stories and demonstrations revealing the history of these tunes and the regions they come from. We’ll introduce the traditional foot percussion accompaniment style, and hand out music (plus chocolate and stickers) at the end of class. Please bring a recording device.
Celtic Fiddle (B/I): This course will introduce beginning/intermediate fiddlers to the modes, ornaments and bowing patterns of Celtic music through learning 3 or 4 new tunes by ear, at a moderately slow pace. We’ll also learn tunes from the Irish and Scottish traditions, plus a new BC West Coast Celtic tune which will be specially composed for the class. Stories, humour, demonstrations, sheet music, chocolate and stickers will be used as learning tools. Please bring a recording device.
Cyd Smith
Beginning Swing: We’ll learn a few essential moveable chords that fit into all kinds of swing tunes. We’ll explore the subtleties of swing rhythm, and even learn a song or two.
Beyond 1, 4 and 5: We’ll get into a little practical chord theory here, starting with a familiar three-chord song and experimenting with dressing it up harmonically. Be prepared to get really acquainted with the names of the notes on your guitar neck.
Anne Weiss
Sing, Sing More, Sing Better, Sing Fabulously, Sing Your Head Off: This class will address technique: breathing, phrasing, physiology, tone, vibrato, warm ups, and how to make different styles of sound at will—gospel, bluegrass, opera, folk, blues! We’ll do problem-solving and use songs or pieces of songs from around the world to help us employ our new singing techniques.

Blues, Blues, Blues: In this multilevel blues guitar class we will approach the three major blues styles: Piedmont , Delta and Chicago, learning at least one song in each style. More advanced students will learn embellishments, lead, voicing and arrangement, while new students will have a chance to learn the basic chords. Attention will be paid to blues history, rhythm and feel.

2005

SUMMER CAMP 2005 – INSTRUCTORS & COURSES

B: Beginner I: Intermediate A: Advanced
Linda Allen

Songwriting: Digging for Diamonds (B): Where do we find the inspiration and courage to write that first song? How do we write with clarity and compassion? What gets in our way? Exercises, tips and tools for beginning songwriters.

Songwriting: Polishing the Stones (I, A): How do we push beyond “good enough” to “Wow!”? This is an opportunity to bring in unfinished songs or to write new ones. Linda provides exercises, resources, tips, challenges, and unrelenting support!
Phil Belanger

Rhythm Basics: This course will help to demystify rhythm, with a hands-on approach to listening, feeling, playing and counting. You will get a look at rhythm tablature and traditional notation style and, depending on class interests, we’ll have fun exploring Brazilian samba and Cuban son.

Rhythm Accompaniment: This class will sharpen your ability to “fit in” to any musical situation. You will learn basic playing techniques for some of the more common percussion instruments, including shakers, cowbells, hand drums (conga, djembe and doumbek), stick, brush, snare drum and whatever else we may find.
Keith Bennett

Blues Harmonica: From the store to the first song can take so little time if you have the right guidance. Let me fill in the gaps and have you playing in no time. Great for guitarists that want another instrument to solo while they play. Bring a 10 hole diatonic harmonica in the key of C. Guitarists bring a harp rack.

Getting the Most Out of a Song: Why should we listen to you? Learn the components that make song delivery memorable and engaging: dynamics, phrasing, accompaniment, interpretation, arrangement, pacing, beginnings and endings. Bring a song to interpret.
Rosemary Campbell

Swing Guitar Basics: Learn to make familiar songs really swing. We’ll work on movable chords that will allow you to play in any key and we’ll add a few simple chord substitutions to spice up your arrangements. There will be lots of playing and singing in class!

Freddie Green Guitar Style: For more than 50 years, Freddie Green’s guitar playing laid the foundation for the harmonic groove of the Count Basie Orchestra. Using 3-note chords, he was able to create a powerful sense of harmonic movement. In this class you’ll learn some of these chords and see how it all works.
Bruce Clausen

Soloing (I, A): How to make coherent and convincing music on the fly. We’ll offer various approaches to improvisation using blues, country and swing tunes, how to work from the melody, the chords, and the key areas, phrasing and rhythmic articulation. Participants should know a little about scales and chords, but emphasis is on using our EARS.

Brazilian Guitar Styles: For finger-style players, nylon or steel. Basics of rhythm playing for samba, bossa nova and choro styles, with lots of syncopation and jazzy chords. Lead-playing opportunities for good readers and improvisers. We’ll make our own arrangements and play them as a band—there’ll be something for players at all levels to do.
Michael Dunn

Hot Club Swing: We’ll explore the rhythmic styles of Django Reinhardt: the chords, right hand techniques, turn-arounds and tone production characteristic of the hot club sound. This course is suitable both for novice Django-style players and those with more experience.

Hawaiian Guitar: Aloha! Learn to play Hawaiian guitar. Imagine a soft breeze on a sandy beach at sunset as you learn to play traditional tunes from the 1920s. This course will cover right-hand picking and left-hand slide techniques involving vibrato and “the slant”. You’ll need a lap-style guitar and a steel bar for this class.
Rick Fines

Slide Guitar: We’ll look at techniques essential to slide, such as vibrato, left- and right-hand muting, hammer-ons and pull-offs. We’ll play together, exploring these techniques and basic principles of pitch and right-hand fingering. Both open and standard tuning will be used as we coax sounds from our bottleneck ranging from sweet and melodic to the sting of Muddy Waters. Bring your slide!

Open Tunings: We’ll approach D and G open tunings from a blues background, however there will be a lot that will apply to any style of music. We’ll examine the new intervals and chord shapes that tend to intimidate those new to open tunings and see ways that these tunings help to free us from some of the constraints of standard tuning.
John Hough

Introduction to Travis Picking: Named after guitarist Merle Travis, this style has been adapted by many others in country and folk music. It is a finger-style of picking characterized by an alternating bass line familiar in the music of Gordon Lightfoot, Bob Dylan, Tom Paxton, and Peter, Paul and Mary. We’ll learn the basics of the picking pattern and how to apply it to some familiar songs.

Canadian Folk Song Workshop: We’ll explore songs from a few well-known and inspiring Canadian songwriters. Various instruments and/or voices are welcome as we learn the intricacies of rhythm, picking patterns, chord progressions, vocal phrasing and harmonies.
Craig McGregor

Flat-picking Canadian Fiddle Tunes (B): This class will emphasize basic flat-picking technique (alternate picking, hammer-ons and pull-offs). We will also cover how to practise and ways to correct recurring problems. All these techniques will be applied to some great old time Canadian tunes that you will be able to play by the end of the course.

Flat-picking Canadian Fiddle Tunes (I): This course will build on the techniques covered in level 1 and will be applied to more advanced tunes (waltz, jig, reel and novelty) all from the Great White North.
Earle Peach

Beginner’s Harmony: Have you always wondered how those clever harmony singers do it? Now learn how! We’ll be taking a practical approach starting with rounds, that will have you making up harmonies to tunes you know by the end of the second day.

Gospel Singing: There’s more to Gospel than meets the ear: unique ways of learning, harmonizing and sharing. The aim is to learn these special qualities of the music, as well as some beautiful, lively, spirit-based music. No music reading required.
Valdy

Accompaniment (B and I): Accompaniment: concomitant, complement, added for embellishment, for completeness. We’ll learn to create parallel motion to a melody, let the guitar be the vehicle for the motion, and thus accompany the voice adequately. Hammering away will get you there but accompanying using turnarounds, passing chords and other techniques is a courteous, artful route.
Anne Weiss

Sing, Sing More, Sing Better, Sing Fabulously, Sing Your Head Off: This class will address technique: breathing, phrasing, physiology, tone, vibrato, warm ups, and how to make different styles of sound at will—gospel, bluegrass, opera, folk, blues! We’ll do problem-solving and use songs or pieces of songs from around the world to help us employ our new singing techniques.

Blues, Blues, Blues: In this multilevel blues guitar class we will approach the three major blues styles: Piedmont, Delta and Chicago, learning at least one song in each style. More advanced students will learn embellishments, lead, voicing and arrangement, while new students will have a chance to learn the basic chords. Attention will be paid to blues history, rhythm and feel.

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2004

2004 Class Details
Home Up 2003 Class Details

SUMMER CAMP 2004 – INSTRUCTORS & COURSES

B: Beginner I: Intermediate A: Advanced
Bruce Clausen

Soloing on Guitar (I): Improvised solos on basic blues, country and swing tunes can be developed from modal scales, melodies, and chord progressions. We will work through some familiar tunes by ear and apply each of these approaches. This will involve a small amount of theory – participants should know a few scales.

Mandolin: All levels welcome. Topics may include left and right hand technique for scales, chords and arpeggios; melody playing in single notes, tremolo and double stops; chord progressions and strums. We will work through some familiar tunes with lead and rhythm parts plus solo breaks.
Steve Dawson

Blues Slide (B/I): We’ll be covering the basic right and left hand techniques, simple improvising and the repertoire of country and delta blues slide players like Blind Willie Johnson, Tampa Red, Robert Johnson and others. Past slide experience is a plus, but not essential. Bring a slide!

Hawaiian Guitar (B/I): In this class, we’ll look at some of the basic techniques involved in playing lap-style Hawaiian guitar. We’ll be focussing on repertoire from the 1920’s and 30’s era of the instrument (pre-Don Ho Hawaiian, I like to call it). A lap-style guitar of some sort is essential for this class, as is a steel bar for playing slide.
Colleen Eccleston

Songwriting (B): When they work, songs are greater than the sum of their parts. We’ll see how these parts work and build towards the final effect, and also examine the creative idea and how our choices affect its expression. Learn to think out of the box and capture your ideas in song.

Developing a Songwriting Toolkit (I): Which comes first, the rhythm or the melody, the lyrics or the rhyme scheme? We’ll focus on the musicality, rhythm and power of language, and how these affect melody, guitar parts, singing and arrangement. If you’re stuck, we’ll give some new vantage points from which to approach your songs.
Michael Friedman

Adventures in Altered Guitar Tunings (B/I and I/A): Techniques for successfully mastering the playing of your guitar in anything but standard tuning. Includes some right hand techniques and applied theory.
Lauri Lyster

Beginner Percussion: We’ll deal with the basics of rhythmic work – keeping good time, subdivisions, syncopation etc. We’ll meet a variety of percussion instruments, working on correct technique, idiomatic patterns and tasteful accompaniment. We’ll also touch upon hand drumming and have fun playing grooves in an ensemble. Bring percussion instruments if you have them.

Intermediate Percussion: We’ll build upon and strengthen your rhythmic knowledge, working with polyrhythms and hand vs. hand independence. A variety of small percussion instruments will be introduced, as well as hand and stick drums, and after we’ve covered the basics of these instruments, including technique and idiomatic patterns, we’ll play together. Bring percussion instruments if you have them.
Sam Masich

Secondary Chords (B/I): An excellent foundation for writing songs and accompaniment, this class will deal with easy, secondary chord shapes to quickly extend your understanding and ability with simple primary chords (open C, G, Am etc.). Using simple shapes, we will explore the missing links which baffle many intermediate level guitarists. Bring paper, pencil & guitar.

Playing Along (B/I): Ever feel lost in a jamming circle? Accompanying other singers or melodic instruments can provide novice and intermediate players with some challenges. This class is useful for those who want to get in there at jamming circles but don¹t know how and for those who want to provide support for other players. Bring paper, pencil & guitar.
John Miller

Composing Jazz Tunes (I/A): We will discuss compositional tools and styles employed in the composition of Jazz tunes. Topics include Blues in Jazz, modes, modulations, melodic development, etc.

Arranging Jazz Standards for Solo Guitar (A): We will work with several well and lesser known tunes and see what is involved in arranging them for solo guitar so that the chordal sense of the song is preserved while melody is emphasized simultaneously.
Earle Peach

Beginner’s Harmony: Have you always wondered how those clever harmony singers do it? Now learn how! We’ll be taking a practical approach starting with rounds, that will have you making up harmonies to tunes you know by the end of the second day.

Gospel Singing: There’s more to Gospel than meets the ear: unique ways of learning, harmonizing and sharing. The aim is to learn these special qualities of the music, as well as some beautiful, lively, spirit-based music. No music reading required.
Andreas Schuld

Introductory Improvisation (B/I): This class covers the basics of improvisation. Simple tools are offered enabling the students to solo effectively in a variety of musical situations – be it Blues, Country, Jazz or Folk. Basic chord/scale relationships are explained.

Licks & Tricks (I): This class opens a bag full of tricks and licks for the intermediate player – great rhythm grooves and right hand techniques, licks, shortcuts, chop-builders, soloing tips, and much much more.
Jennifer Scott

Vocal Technique: Learn about body awareness, the mechanics of vocalizing, “counting breaths” breathing method, and basic comfort in singing alone and with others. Each class will involve body and vocal “warm-ups” and simple repertoire learned in class. Handouts provided & taping of classes is highly recommended!

Sing Like a Pro: Tune up your existing repertoire, learn some new tunes (variety of styles) and become the successful singer you were meant to be! We will practise the methods of a working singer: how to direct other musicians, count in a tune professionally, and be confident in a solo situation. Class size will be limited to 10 students. Handouts and some repertoire will be provided. Students will be required to have two songs ready to work on in class.
Nancy Thorwardson

Ukulele (B/I): Looking to add a new sound to your session? Try the ukulele! The instrument whose popularity is truly sweeping the nation, this little gem can get toes a-tappin’ and lips a-flappin’ in no time! Gather up all your ukes and together we will explore chord and strum patterns and “uke it up” on tons of tunes, both old and new.

Swing-Style Rhythm Guitar (B/I): Expand your playing with this lively guitar style that sounds great with standard and western swing music. Learn swing chord forms and strum patterns, explore swing chord progressions and substitutions, and grow familiar with reading and playing from chord charts. Become a strong yet subtle rhythm guitar player, and you will be welcome in any jam session!
Barry Truter

Fingerpicking Patterns (B and I): We’ll explore a variety of fingerstyle guitar patterns to add color and texture to your arrangements. Beginner level will use well-known songs to demonstrate practical techniques for song accompaniment. Intermediate level will emphasize weaving melody lines and fill-ins around rhythm chords to spice up the effect.

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2003

SUMMER CAMP 2003 – INSTRUCTORS & COURSES

B: Beginner I: Intermediate A: Advanced
Andreas Schuld (for Erin Corday)

Percussive Techniques for Guitar (B-I): We’ll focus on right-hand technique to learn how polyrhythms, harmonics, hammer-ons, pull-offs, string stops and strums can help you evoke samba, bass montuno, mbira and kalimba. Includes rhythmic principles, vocal percussion and muting effects.

Open-minded Tunings (B-I): How do you turn standard chord progressions into stunning guitar arrangements? We’ll learn specific tunings and focus on arrangement concepts (chord voicing, bass movement, dynamics, etc.), intuitive approaches and practical applications.
Patricia Dalquist

Vocal Technique: Drawing from an array of exercises, you’ll learn an holistic approach to voice production. We’ll investigate the whole body as your instrument, including how attitude can affect your voice. We’ll relax the body, work the voice, then we’ll sing!

Gospel Singing: We will warm up our voices, getting to the most open sound. After listening to different examples of improvisation, you’ll learn to access your own creative gospel expression. There’ll be answer and harmony work and we’ll finish the class with a joyful noise!
Steve Dawson

Slide Guitar (B-I): This course will be an overview of some right and left hand techniques involved in playing slide.We’ll learn two standard slide tunings and several blues standards that use them. We’ll also look at basic improvisation and some solo slide in the Delta blues vein.

Toolbox of Cunning Guitar Tips (B-I): For those interested in learning more about rhythm, improvising and building a repertoire of sneaky licks that will impress friends and foes alike. We will cover styles such as blues, bluegrass, swing and more.
Ruthie Dornfield

Scandinavian Fiddle Smorgasbord (I): A sampler of tunes from the great fiddling traditions of Denmark, Sweden and Finland. Both lead and harmony parts will be taught by ear with attention to style. We’ll also listen to recordings of some of the great players from these countries.

Quebecois Fiddling: Reels, jigs and waltzes from French Canada will be taught by ear. Bowing, tone, ornamentation and rhythmic emphasis distinctive to Quebec music will be covered, as well as a discussion of influential players.
Colleen Eccleston

Songwriting (B): When they work, songs are greater than the sum of their parts. We’ll see how these parts work and build towards the final effect, and also examine the creative idea and how our choices affect its expression. Learn to think out of the box and capture your ideas in song.

Developing a Songwriting Toolkit (I): Which comes first, the rhythm or the melody, the lyrics or the rhyme scheme? We’ll focus on the musicality, rhythm and power of language, and how these affect melody, guitar parts, singing and arrangement. If you’re stuck, we’ll give some new vantage points from which to approach your songs.
Lauri Lyster

Beginner Percussion: We’ll deal with the basics of rhythmic work – keeping good time, subdivisions, syncopation, etc. We’ll meet a variety of percussion instruments, working on correct technique, idiomatic patterns and tasteful accompaniment. We’ll also touch upon hand drumming and have fun playing grooves in an ensemble. Bring percussion instruments if you have them.

Intermediate Percussion: We’ll build upon and strengthen your rhythmic knowledge, working with polyrhythms and hand vs. hand independence. A variety of small percussion instruments will be introduced, as well as hand and stick drums, and after we’ve covered the basics of these instruments, including technique and idiomatic patterns, we’ll play together. Bring percussion instruments if you have them.
John Miller

Chord Voicing Options (I-A): We’ll provide you with the conceptual tools you’ll need to accompany a song using different chord voicings up and down the neck. Working within the context of jazz and bossa standards, we’ll see how to derive more complex chords from the very first chord shapes you learned on the guitar.

Learning to Read Music (B): Being able to read music opens up an entire world of repertoire. We’ll provide you with a knowledge of the symbols and system that will enable you, with practice, to sight sing or play unfamiliar melodies from written notation.
Gary Stevenson

Flatpicking (B and I): Develop the basics of lead flatpicking, including licks, passages and melodies, using traditional fiddle tunes or other standards. Beginner level will focus on pick direction, finger position and timing. Intermediate level will work on left and right hand techniques such as hammer and cross-picking to move beyond basic melodies, and will also introduce improvisation.
Sue Thompson

Rhythm Slaves Revolt (I): At jam sessions do you always play chords while someone else plays melody? Have you wanted to try playing some solos of your own, but felt shy or uncertain how to begin? Join us as we break the bonds of rhythm slavery and start playing some leads. You’ll need solid rhythm guitar experience and a willingness to take chances.

From Duets to Doo-Wop: A repertoire class for those who want to have fun singing harmony. We’ll do a variety of song styles from the Bahamas to the Beatles, the Delmore Brothers to the Del-Vikings. Prerequisite: ability to stay on your part (reasonably well) while others are singing something else.
Barry Truter

Fingerpicking Patterns (B-I): This course is rich in tips and techniques for fingerstyle accompaniment. We’ll use well-known songs to explore a variety of picking patterns to add texture and colour to your arrangements.

Ragtime Blues (B-I): The syncopation of ragtime meets the soul of the blues! Through the music of Bessie Smith, Reverend Gary Davis and others we’ll explore the basics of this dynamic musical style.
Valdy

Accompaniment (B and I): Accompaniment: concomitant, complement, added for embellishment, for completeness. We’ll learn to create parallel motion to a melody, let the guitar be the vehicle for the motion, and thus accompany the voice adequately. Hammering away will get you there but accompanying using turnarounds, passing chords and other techniques is a courteous, artful route.
Randy Vic (accompanist Dave Marshall)

Celtic Guitar Back-up (B-I): Explore the fundamentals of effective Celtic backup guitar and how to make yourself welcome at any session.

Celtic Guitar Backup (I-A): Create more interesting backup; discover drop-D and DADGAD tunings, and apply chord progressions and substitutions.

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2002

SUMMER CAMP 2002 – INSTRUCTORS & COURSES

B: Beginner I: Intermediate A: Advanced
Keith Bennett

Let’s Play the Blues: We’ll learn many variations of the blues and look at soloing ideas. By exploring the many types of blues songs we’ll increase repertoire and have fun too. No tough chords or changes. Open to all instruments and singers.

Blues Harmonica: From the store to the first song can take so little time with the right guidance – you’ll be playing in no time. Great for guitarists who want another instrument to solo while they play. Bring a 10 hole diatonic harmonica (key of C). Guitarists also bring a harp rack.
Danny Casavant

Soul and R&B for the Acoustic Guitar (B-I): A real boundary jumper, this course will introduce ideas and techniques usually associated with the electric guitar. Tunes and concepts from artists such as Curtis Mayfield, T-Bone Walker and BB King will open up new creative ideas and breathe new life into your soloing and rhythm guitar playing.

Practical Music Theory (I-A): This will be a hands-on class using theory to bring concepts alive as music. Recommended for any guitarist interested in composition or songwriting.
Erin Corday

Percussive Techniques for Guitar (B-I): We’ll focus on right-hand technique to learn how polyrhythms, harmonics, hammer-ons, pull-offs, string stops and strums can help you evoke samba, bass montuno, mbira and kalimba. Includes rhythmic principles, vocal percussion and muting effects.

Open-minded Tunings (B-I): How do you turn standard chord progressions into stunning guitar arrangements? We’ll learn specific tunings and focus on arrangement concepts (chord voicing, bass movement, dynamics, etc.), intuitive approaches and practical applications.
Patricia Dalquist

Vocal Technique: Drawing from an array of exercises, you’ll learn an holistic approach to voice production. We’ll investigate the whole body as your instrument, including how attitude can affect your voice. We’ll relax the body, work the voice, then we’ll sing!

Gospel Singing: We will warm up our voices, getting to the most open sound. After listening to different examples of improvisation, you’ll learn to access your own creative gospel statement. There’ll be answer and harmony work and we’ll finish the class with a joyful noise!
Susan Ellenton

Something Out of Nothing: “There ain’t no wrong way to write a song, but that don’t make it easy.” This class is about making it easier. We’ll experiment with a number of different ways to get started – messin’ with melody, foolin’ with form, wrasslin’ with rhythm … pretty soon you’ll be writing songs you never heard before!

Songs Under Construction: Release your unfinished songs from chaos. We’ll listen deeply to each other’s works-in-progress, and foster the ability to re-enter the creative process in order to recognise “what the song wants”. Bring an unfinished song.
Andy Hillhouse

Celtic Guitar Back-up (B-I): Get inspired to back up Celtic instrumental tunes in an authentic style. Learn effective chord shapes and strumming patterns that will make the most nervous fiddler smile.

Celtic Guitar Backup (I-A): Tools to help develop your own back-up style. DADGAD tuning, Shetland style “swingy” back-up, substitutions and flatpicking tunes.
Sue Malcolm

Slow Pitch Jam: Develop the skills necessary to create music successfully in a group: communication, timing, dynamics, beginnings and endings, and confidence. Students should have a basic knowledge of chords and be able to change chords smoothly – speed is not necessary.
Dick Owings

(A) Celtic Fiddle Styles (B) Old-time Southern Fiddle Styles: For those who are already playing some fiddle and wish to more closely evoke these classic traditional styles in your sound and repetoire. In the Celtic course we’ll explore examples of Cape Breton and Irish fiddling. The Old-time course will focus on several tunes from the Southern U.S. tradition. Provided transcriptions will help you learn techniques of bowing and ornamentation which characterize the style. By the end of each course your bow and fingers will have new ways to slur, accent, double-stop, cut, slide, warble, roll and treble!
Dale Rasmussen

Introduction to Vocal Harmony: For those with little or no experience in harmony singing, we’ll learn and apply the basic principles of simple harmony using easy-to-learn songs.

Intermediate Vocal Harmony: For those with some experience singing harmony, this class will focus on complex arrangements from traditional gospel, bluegrass and jazz in 3 and 4 parts. Emphasis is on
singing and arranging songs for performance. We’ll also work on jazz harmony and some fun ear training.
Andreas Schuld

Licks and Tricks (B-I): You’ll learn easy but highly effective licks and techniques which can be applied in a variety of playing situations. Handouts and CDs will be available, featuring all licks played at slow and normal speed, as well as backing tracks.

Country Blues (I): We’ll cover the fundamentals of country blues fingerpicking and basic techniques as well as licks and turnarounds in the styles of masters like Leadbelly, Big Bill Broonzy, Brownie McGhee, and Mississippi John Hurt.
Gary Stevenson

Flatpicking (B and I): Develop the basics of lead flatpicking, including licks, passages and melodies, using traditional fiddle tunes or other standards. Beginner level will focus on pick direction, finger position and timing. Intermediate level will work on left and right hand techniques such as hammer and cross-picking to move beyond basic melodies, and will also introduce improvisation.
Barry Truter

Folk Style Fingerpicking (B-I): Slim pickin’s? No way! This course is rich in tips and techniques for fingerstyle accompaniment. We’ll use well-known songs to explore a variety of picking patterns to add texture and color to your arrangements. (Assumes ability to move easily between common major and minor chords.)
Joe Vinikow

Swing Starts Here: If you can play a barre F chord, you’ll soon be navigating the upper fingerboard confidently and learning the most useful moveable chord positions, so you can play in any key without a capo. Incorporate more sophisticated harmonic voicings for creative accompaniment in swing, jazz, and western swing. Build your repertoire with an eclectic starter kit of jam session favorites.

Lady Be Gone: Here’s a song sampler hand-picked to add some zing to your thing: dance tunes, torch songs, jump blues, novelty numbers and western swing. We’ll stray down some musical byways in search of overlooked gems, to add color and variety to your repertoire. All vocalists and instruments welcome; chord and lyric sheets provided.

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2001

SUMMER CAMP 2001 – INSTRUCTORS & COURSES
B: Beginner I: Intermediate A: Advanced
Danny Casavant
Blues, Soul and R&B for the Acoustic Guitar (I): A real boundary jumper, this course will introduce ideas and techniques usually associated with the electric guitar. Tunes and concepts from artists such as Curtis Mayfield, T-Bone Walker and BB King will open up new creative possibilities and breathe new life into your soloing and rhythm guitar playing.

Practical Music Theory for Guitarists (I): This will be a hands-on class where theory will be put to use so that concepts will come alive as music. This practical class is recommended for any guitarist interested in composition or song writing.
Christine Duncan
Vocal Technique: Christine will share her insights on use of the voice for performance as well as for personal exploration. Utilizing improvisation, interpretation and energetic work, participants will be able to explore their strengths and limitations for full vocal expression. Bring a tune you are working on. Be prepared to dive off the high board!

Vocal Master Class: A class for those who want to take performing to the next level. Be prepared to perform a song and get some helpful feedback. Tips on stylizing, improvising, poise and authentic connection. There will be an accompanist available, so bring a chart or feel free to play for yourself.
Paul Elliot
Techniques for Swing Fiddle: Playing jazz violin takes more ‘chops’ than most other kinds of fiddle music. In this class you’ll learn some short easy things to practice that can improve tone, bow control and intonation. We’ll also learn some solos that use different kinds of attacks, bowing and phrasing to help put your new technique to good use.

Learning/Hearing Tunes: Tools and tricks to help you learn tunes more quickly. We’ll do some ear training and talk about what to listen for and how to hear it. Then we’ll learn some tunes by ear, starting simply and ending up with some jazz standards.
John Hough
Just Pickin’ Along (B-I): An introduction to finger-picking based on the alternating bass pattern (Travis picking). This provides a great background for vocals and adds a rhythm and texture to the sound. Also explores how this finger style and strumming can complement each other.

Canadian Folk Repertoire (B-I): Learn techniques to play some classics by Canadian greats such as Gordon Lightfoot and Stan Rogers. Sheet music and tablature provided.
Ray Piper
Brazilian Rhythms (I): Using fairly simple chord shapes, this course will cover some right hand rhythm patterns for Brazilian music.

Improvisation (I-A): Improvisation using simplified patterns which work in many styles and keys.
Dale Rasmussen
Intermediate Vocal Harmony: For those with some experience singing harmony, this class will focus on complex arrangements from traditional gospel, bluegrass and jazz in 3 and 4 parts. Emphasis will be on singing and arranging songs for performance. The class will also work on jazz harmony and some fun ear training.
John Reischman
Mandolin Styles I and II (I-A): This class will cover various styles including bluegrass, jazz, folk and Latin. We will work on both lead and rhythm.
Andreas Schuld
Licks and Tricks (B-I): In this class players will learn a multitude of easy but highly effective licks and techniques which can be applied in a variety of playing situations. Handouts and CDs will be available, featuring all licks played in slow and normal speed, as well as backing tracks.

Open Tunings (I-A): Thanks to the commercial success of guitarist/singer/songwriters such as Shawn Colvin, as well as numerous acoustic guitar-driven pop and rock bands, there has been a re-emergence of open tunings in all styles of music. This class will explore a variety of common and not-so-common open tunings and their applications. CDs and handouts will be available.
Greg Scott
Songwriting 101: If you’re still new to song writing, this class is for you. How to generate song ideas. Steps for turning a rough idea into a finished song. Rhyme schemes and rhyming techniques. Song form. Beginnings, middles, and endings. Fun writing exercises to get you going.

Songwriting 102: You¹ve been writing for a while, but now you want to move to the next level. Genre-specific writing. The fine points of word choice. ‘True rhymes’. Hooks. Advanced chord progressions. Melodies that are ‘interesting’ but also singable. Collaboration techniques. Leave your ego at home for this class: we’ll write some songs, tear them apart, and put them together again!
Russell Shumsky
Drumming Rhythms and Technique (B): This hand-drumming workshop will explore basic playing technique for the Cuban conga drum and West African djembe. Participants will learn traditional rhythms from Cuba and Africa ; the idea is to have fun and learn something new. Bring your own drum (some drums provided).
Sue Thompson
Rhythm Slaves Unite!: At jam sessions do you always play the chords while someone else plays melody? Have you wanted to try playing some solos of your own, but felt shy or uncertain about how to begin? Join us as we break the bonds of rhythm slavery and start playing some leads. Prerequisites: rhythm guitar experience and willingness to take chances.

Secrets of Harmony Singing Revealed: If you can sing a part someone else teaches you, but can¹t figure out the part yourself, this class will solve the mystery of how it¹s done. You¹ll be inventing simple harmony parts by the end of the class.
Joe Vinikow (for Nancy Thorwardson)
Western Swing Repertoire (B-I): Fill your musical saddlebags with warm and wonderful western swing tunes, replete with images of the out-of-doors, evenings around the campfire, the desert breeze, the prairie moon, and the wide open spaces. We will cover treasured favourites from the Hollywood cowboy days, learn classic dance tunes from the western swing big band era, and explore some of the western music being written today.

Intro to Swing Style Rhythm Guitar (I): Expand your playing with this lively guitar style that sounds great with standard and western swing music. Learn swing chord forms and strum patterns, explore progressions and substitutions, and grow familiar with reading and playing from chord charts. Become a strong yet subtle rhythm guitar player, and you will be welcome in any jam session!

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